Form I-212: Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission

What is Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission

Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal, is a form used by individuals who have previously been deported or removed from the United States and wish to return to the country.

This form is used to request permission from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to reapply for admission into the United States after deportation or removal. The form must be completed by the individual who was deported or removed, and it must be submitted to the appropriate USCIS office.

The form includes information about the individual’s identity, the reason for their deportation or removal, and the individual’s reasons for wanting to return to the United States. The form also includes information about the individual’s criminal history, if any, and any other relevant information that may affect the individual’s eligibility for readmission.

The USCIS will review the Form I-212 and consider factors such as the individual’s qualifications, the reason for their deportation or removal, and the individual’s reasons for wanting to return to the United States. The USCIS also considers if the individual has any other immigration violations or if the individual is a security risk.

It’s important to note that the Form I-212 is not a guarantee of readmission into the United States and the USCIS has the discretion to approve or deny the application based on the individual’s qualifications and the requirements of the immigration laws and regulations. In addition to that, the I-212 is not a substitute for a visa, if the individual is coming from a country that requires a visa, the individual will need to apply for a visa before returning to the United States.

In summary, Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal, is a form used by individuals who have previously been deported or removed from the United States and wish to return to the country. The form is used to request permission from the USCIS to reapply for admission into the United States after deportation or removal. The USCIS will review the form and consider factors such as the individual’s qualifications, the reason for their deportation or removal, and the individual’s reasons for wanting to return to the United States. The form is not a guarantee of readmission into the United States and the USCIS has the discretion to approve or deny the application based on the individual’s qualifications and the requirements of the immigration laws and regulations.

Who Needs to Fill Out I-212 Form?

Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal, is typically used by individuals who have previously been deported or removed from the United States and wish to return to the country.

Individuals who may need to fill out this form include those who have been removed or deported from the United States due to immigration violations such as overstaying a visa, entering the country illegally, or committing a crime.

It’s important to note that individuals who have been removed or deported from the United States are barred from returning to the country for a certain period of time, and they need to request permission from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to reapply for admission.

It is also important to note that if an individual is inadmissible to the United States, they will not be able to apply for a visa or be admitted to the United States without first obtaining a waiver of inadmissibility. In such cases, the individual will have to file Form I-601 Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility along with the I-212 Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal.

How to Fill Out I-212 Form?

Filling out Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal, requires attention to detail and a thorough understanding of the form’s instructions and requirements. Below are general steps on how to fill out the form:

  1. Gather all the necessary information and documents, such as passport, birth certificate, and police certificates.
  2. Obtain the latest version of the Form I-212 from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website or from a local USCIS office.
  3. Fill out the form in English using black ink.
  4. Provide all the necessary personal information, such as your full name, date of birth, place of birth, and current address.
  5. Provide information about the reason for your previous deportation or removal, including the date and place of your removal, and the grounds for your inadmissibility.
  6. Explain why you wish to return to the United States.
  7. Provide information about your criminal history, if any.
  8. Pay the required fee, either online or by check or money order.
  9. Gather all the necessary supporting documents, such as police certificates, photographs, and other forms of identification.
  10. Submit the completed form, along with the necessary supporting documents and fee, to the appropriate USCIS office.

It’s important to note that the USCIS may request additional information or documentation at any time during the processing of your application. It is also important to be honest and accurate in filling out the form and providing the required documentation, as providing false information may lead to the denial of your application.

What is the I-212 Fee?

The fee for Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal, is currently $930, as of 2021. This fee is subject to change and can be verified on the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website.

The fee for Form I-212 must be paid in U.S. dollars and can be paid online using the USCIS online payment system, by check or money order made payable to the “U.S. Department of Homeland Security”, or by credit card using Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions.

It’s important to note that the fee for Form I-212 is separate from any other fees, such as the fee for a visa or the fee for an application for adjustment of status.

It is also worth noting that some individuals may be eligible for a fee waiver, meaning that they do not have to pay the fee. To request a fee waiver, the applicant must file Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, along with their application. The USCIS will review the request and determine if the applicant is eligible for a fee waiver based on their financial situation.

What is the I-212 Processing Time?

The processing time for Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal, varies depending on various factors such as the individual’s qualifications, the workload of the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) service center that is processing the petition, and the individual’s specific circumstances.

According to the USCIS website, as of 2021, the processing time for Form I-212 can range from several months to several years. The exact processing time for an individual’s application will depend on the specific circumstances of their case and the workload of the service center. It is important to note that the processing times posted on the USCIS website are estimates and may vary depending on the specific circumstances of the case and the workload of the service center.

It’s also important to note that the processing time for Form I-212 can be longer if an applicant is inadmissible to the United States, in such cases the individual will have to file Form I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility along with the I-212. The processing time for I-601 is also subject to the workload and availability of the service center and can take several months to several years.

It’s important to check the status of the application frequently and contact the USCIS if there are any delays or issues with the application.

I-212 Frequently Asked Questions

Here are some frequently asked questions regarding Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal:

  • Who needs to fill out Form I-212? Form I-212 is typically used by individuals who have been removed or deported from the United States and wish to return to the country. Individuals who may need to fill out this form include those who have been removed or deported from the United States due to immigration violations such as overstaying a visa, entering the country illegally, or committing a crime.
  • How much does it cost to file Form I-212? As of 2021, the fee for Form I-212 is $930, which is subject to change and can be verified on the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website.
  • How long does it take to process Form I-212? The processing time for Form I-212 varies depending on various factors such as the individual’s qualifications, the workload of the USCIS service center, and the individual’s specific circumstances. According to the USCIS website, as of 2021, the processing time for Form I-212 can range from several months to several years.
  • Can I work while my Form I-212 is being processed? No, individuals who are waiting for a decision on their Form I-212 are not authorized to work in the United States.
  • Can I travel outside of the United States while my Form I-212 is being processed? It is not recommended to travel outside the United States while your Form I-212 is being processed, as it may affect the processing of your application.
  • What happens if my Form I-212 is denied? If your Form I-212 is denied, you will not be able to return to the United States unless you obtain a new visa or obtain a different form of relief.
  • Can I appeal a denied Form I-212? You may be able to appeal a denied Form I-212 by filing a motion to reopen or a motion to reconsider with the USCIS office that issued the denial.